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GARTH PRINCE - ROLE MODEL & AMBASSADOR 
CANADIAN-NAMIBIAN SINGER AND AFRICAN WORKSHOP FACILITATOR
Officially Inducted into the “National Wall of Role Models” on June 7, 2014 ( See full list www.BlackCanadianAwards.com )
GARTH PRINCE south african awards edmonton singer achiever role model banner
Tell us a little bit about yourself? 
I am a full-time performing artist, a full-time husband and a full-time parent. Growing up, many elders (including my parents) told me that there is no way to make a living by doing music. I was encouraged to get a steady job and do music as a hobby. So, that it was I did initially. It may have been a difficult path, but I am happy to say that years later, things have changed, and my part-time hobby has become a full-time passion because of the excellent opportunities here in Canada. A combination of concerts and workshops prove to keep me just as busy as would any other career.

The transition to full-time singer was not easy, but my supportive wife has made it possible by believing in me. You know the story... Behind every successful man, is an AMAZING woman, and that is clearly the case here. I am also blessed with a “million-dollar family” as I am lucky to have a baby boy and also a girl. These two little ones are a real joy to come home to after my trips.

What many people may not know about you? 
I love food! I love food even more than I love music. I didn't become a chef because: I simply happened to be (MUCH) better at making music than I am at cooking. So in my home, I typically do the cooking and my family members get to be my guinea pigs when I try new ideas. I generally do just fine, but the worst was when I threw cherries in a curry; a most memorable “incident” in our home, but not in the way I had hoped.

What's your inspiration and how do you get motivated?
My love for creating and performing music is so strong that it can wake me up at 5am in the morning. I seem to have a natural intrinsic desire to constantly work on my music and on the business matters that support it.
GARTH PRINCE south african awards edmonton singer achiever role model
How did you get to where you are now and what more should we expect?
The biggest contribution to my success would be the Mascato Choir from Namibia. In the choir I was trained to really sing, and I met mentors who may have modeled the work ethic I have today. One thing you can expect from me, is that through my success, I will continue to find ways to mentor others in the same way that I was mentored.

What would you like to be remembered for?
I don’t mind if people forget about me, but one thing I wish for is that my music and lyrics continue to inspire and give people joy long after I am gone.

How do you balance work, family, friends and leisure?
I wish I could make more time for friends. As for the balancing act within the family, we tend to spend week day evenings together, and I try to keep that clear from work engagements.

What's your favorite food, book, music and movie?

Food: Pan-fried (then briefly oven-baked) salmon
Book: The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko
Music: South African band “Freshlyground”
Instead of movie, I offer my favorite comedian:  Trevor Noah 

What's your experience as a Black person in Canada?
I feel that throughout my travels I have come to understand that skin-color is no longer the biggest divider among us. Financial status is one of the biggest dividers now. When I was a kid, my country (Namibia) was still under the South African “apartheid” (segregation) system. Even back then I saw two young boys (one black and one white) become best friends because their parents were exceedingly wealthy. It was nearly impossible for normal or poor kids to become part of their inner circle.  

Solutions? I tend to not focus on things that I cannot control, so I prefer to not try to persuade others to change their behavior, but I can simply model the correct behavior and try to teach my kids to not judge people by their material possessions.

Are there as many opportunities for Blacks in Canada that can produce role models and institutions like TD Jakes, Beyoncé, Tyler Perry, Obama, BET, etc?
I believe that if your parents or mentors have the resources, or you somehow get access to resources and funding, anything is possible (assuming you are extremely talented of course). I do however perceive that Canada’s economy is very different from that of the United States. Many of Canada’s top artists seem to make it to a very high level of success by tapping into the US market.

Mention a few of your favorite Black Canadian Leaders, Artists and Role Models?

I was most inspired to meet Pinball Clemons. I heard him speak at an event and his words of wisdom were very enlightening.

Should & do Blacks support / patronize black music, events and businesses?
I attend and host black events myself. I think it is simply a means to an end. I hope for us to evolve as a society to a day that we no longer see each other as black and white. It would be best to support musicians, events and businesses for their excellent work instead.

Give us a few words from you to an uninspired person?
People publish their best moments. Their trials are kept silent and therefore it’s tempting to think that you alone struggle with certain things, when in fact, we are all uninspired at some point. Prayers and/or fellowship with good people usually get me out of a rut, and I hope the same for you. 

Tell us a little bit about yourself?
I am a full-time performing artist, a full-time husband and a full-time parent. Growing up, many elders (including my parents) told me that there is no way to make a living by doing music. I was encouraged to get a steady job and do music as a hobby. So, that it was I did initially. It may have been a difficult path, but I am happy to say that years later, things have changed, and my part-time hobby has become a full-time passion because of the excellent opportunities here in Canada. A combination of concerts and workshops prove to keep me just as busy as would any other career.

The transition to full-time singer was not easy, but my supportive wife has made it possible by believing in me. You know the story... Behind every successful man, is an AMAZING woman, and that is clearly the case here. I am also blessed with a “million-dollar family” as I am lucky to have a baby boy and also a girl. These two little ones are a real joy to come home to after my trips.

What many people may not know about you?
I love food! I love food even more than I love music. I didn't become a chef because: I simply happened to be (MUCH) better at making music than I am at cooking. So in my home, I typically do the cooking and my family members get to be my guinea pigs when I try new ideas. I generally do just fine, but the worst was when I threw cherries in a curry; a most memorable “incident” in our home, but not in the way I had hoped.

What's your inspiration and how do you get motivated?
My love for creating and performing music is so strong that it can wake me up at 5am in the morning. I seem to have a natural intrinsic desire to constantly work on my music and on the business matters that support it.

How did you get to where you are now and what more should we expect?
The biggest contribution to my success would be the Mascato Choir from Namibia. In the choir I was trained to really sing, and I met mentors who may have modeled the work ethic I have today.

One thing you can expect from me, is that through my success, I will continue to find ways to mentor others in the same way that I was mentored.

What would you like to be remembered for?
I don’t mind if people forget about me, but one thing I wish for is that my music and lyrics continue to inspire and give people joy long after I am gone.

How do you balance work, family, friends and leisure?
I wish I could make more time for friends. As for the balancing act within the family, we tend to spend week day evenings together, and I try to keep that clear from work engagements.
 

What's your favorite food, book, music and movie? 

Food: Pan-fried (then briefly oven-baked) salmon 

Book: The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko

Music: South African band “Freshlyground”

Instead of movie, I offer my favorite comedian:  Trevor Noah

What's your experience as a Black person in Canada?
I feel that throughout my travels I have come to understand that skin-color is no longer the biggest divider among us. Financial status is one of the biggest dividers now. When I was a kid, my country (Namibia) was still under the South African “apartheid” (segregation) system. Even back then I saw two young boys (one black and one white) become best friends because their parents were exceedingly wealthy. It was nearly impossible for normal or poor kids to become part of their inner circle.   

Solutions? I tend to not focus on things that I cannot control, so I prefer to not try to persuade others to change their behavior, but I can simply model the correct behavior and try to teach my kids to not judge people by their material possessions.

Are there as many opportunities for Blacks in Canada that can produce role models and institutions like TD Jakes, Beyoncé, Tyler Perry, Obama, BET, etc?

 I believe that if your parents or mentors have the resources, or you somehow get access to resources and funding, anything is possible (assuming you are extremely talented of course). I do however perceive that Canada’s economy is very different from that of the United States. Many of Canada’s top artists seem to make it to a very high level of success by tapping into the US market.

Mention a few of your favorite Black Canadian Leaders, Artists and Role Models?

I was most inspired to meet Pinball Clemons. I heard him speak at an event and his words of wisdom were very enlightening.


Should & do Blacks support / patronize black music, events and businesses?

 I attend and host black events myself. I think it is simply a means to an end. I hope for us to evolve as a society to a day that we no longer see each other as black and white. It would be best to support musicians, events and businesses for their excellent work instead.

Give us a few words from you to an uninspired person?
People publish their best moments. Their trials are kept silent and therefore it’s tempting to think that you alone struggle with certain things, when in fact, we are all uninspired at some point. Prayers and/or fellowship with good people usually get me out of a rut, and I hope the same for you.

Connect via Social Media Links:
Website: www.GarthPrince.com or www.AfricanSong.ca
Facebook:www.facebook.com/princegarthmusic
Twitter: www.twitter.com/PrinceGarth